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News U. HuffPost Personal Video Horoscopes. Newsletters Coupons. Terms Privacy Policy. All rights reserved. Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. Mary's postpartum inspection, The famous Proto-Gospel of James , allegedly written by Jesus' half-brother Joseph's son from a previous marriage tells a tale of the midwife who attended Mary after she had given birth to the Son of God.

She, the midwife, does not believe that Mary has given birth and remained a virgin, and so she gives her a vaginal inspection, only to find that her hymen is still intact. God punishes the midwife for her doubt -- making the offending hand burn -- but the infant Jesus heals her, the first of his many great miracles.

Joseph and Mary: The Generation Gap, Joseph is always portrayed as an old man in the medieval paintings of Jesus' nativity this supposedly explains why he never had sex with Mary. But just how old was he? According to a relatively unknown Gospel called The History of Joseph the Carpenter , Joseph was fully 89 years old when Jesus was born, whereas Mary was all of The account goes on to describe the death of Joseph some twenty-one years later, told in the first-person by his most famous "son," the Son of God himself. Jesus the mischievous Wunderkind.

Jesus may have been a miracle-working Son of God as an adult, but what was he like as a kid? That is the question answered by the amusing Infancy Gospel of Thomas , which regales readers with tales of Jesus' miraculous activities between the ages of five and twelve. As it turns out, Jesus was a mischievous young fellow and had a bit of a temper. Whenever someone irritates him -- a rough playmate or a strict teacher -- he uses his supernatural power to wither him on the spot. Eventually he gets his mood, and his power, under control, and becomes a remarkable young man to have around the carpenter shop and home.

Jesus and sacred sex. In modern novels The Da Vinci Code! Jesus is said to have had a sexual relation with Mary Magdalene. Even stranger tales of Jesus, Mary, and sex were told in ancient Gospels; by all counts the strangest was The Greater Questions of Mary , now lost but quoted once by an early Church Father. According to this tale, Jesus took Mary alone up onto a mountain, and as she watched, he pulled a woman from his side and began to have sex with her. What happens next is even stranger, as it involves a case of divine coitus interruptus and the consumption of semen. Mary, not surprisingly, faints on the spot.

Remarkably, the Gospels of the New Testament do not tell the story of Jesus emerging from the tomb on Easter morning. But the Gospel of Peter does. Jun 22, Laurey rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Everyone. This book is written by a reporter and is about a code that was discovered in the bible that has predicted the future.

It's hard to believe but once you read it and learn the science behind it, it's hard to ignore. I loved this book.

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May 20, Jacky rated it did not like it. I read this before reading the Bible. A lot of the 'interpretations' are nothing short of far-fetched coincidence to idiotic. I bought this crap for a long time. You can do this with any book. Oct 07, Peter rated it did not like it. Mar 21, M.

Hudson rated it did not like it. It is not too often that I come across a book that I really don't care for. This happens to be one of those books. I got through chapter 7 and quit reading. Frankly it is just too much. I had high hope for this book based on the fact the author is coming from a journalistic perspective and not one from religion as he claims to be atheist.

Here is why I could not continue. First of all, I hate the repetitiveness of the author. It seemed to me he repeated himself so much that he was trying to con It is not too often that I come across a book that I really don't care for. It seemed to me he repeated himself so much that he was trying to convince even himself of what he is trying to prove.

Everything that I have read with one exception has been after the fact. What use is a predictive code if you cannot prevent things from happening?

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Even if the "code" is true, truthfully what good is it because most people are not going to base their life on what it says. Finally, and frankly, unless you know Hebrew, the code is useless for the common person, the whole code is being interpreted?


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The author said that you cannot find the "code" in any other language. Honestly, the Hebrew they say are the "code" could be anything. I speak English and a bit of Spanish. How am I to know?

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Bottom line, I think this book and apparently the next two books the author wrote are a bunch of hooey. This gets a one star from me. Disclosure: I purchase a copy of this book for my own collections. Grabbed this at a book sale. The claim is that major historical events, both past and future, have been encoded within the Hebrew Bible. The appendix contains the scientific article that was published to explain the mathematics behind the code.

Aug 12, Luis Loaiza rated it it was ok. Interesting idea, but not quite sure about the facts. Nov 13, Rey rated it it was ok. Stopped halfway for being repetitive. Not my type. Sep 25, James rated it did not like it. I liked it when I read it Apr 18, David Montaigne rated it it was ok. I picked up a cheap copy of Michael Drosnin's "Bible Code" at a yard sale many years after it came out. I had always been intrigued by the idea that information could be encoded in the Bible through ELS, and that computer analysis might reveal something that had not been discovered before computers made these searches possible.

I had never read the book previously because I had heard you could get the same results analyzing "Moby Dick" or anything else of sufficient length. But I am also an autho I picked up a cheap copy of Michael Drosnin's "Bible Code" at a yard sale many years after it came out. But I am also an author of books on prophecy, and I know there are incredible levels of math and science encoded in ancient myths and books. So after years of research and writing and knowing that somewhat similar ideas do have merit, I read the "Bible Code. If I see a fictional novel he writes in the future I will read it.

The book flows well and is an entertaining read, which partially makes up for the disappointing content. There was nothing in the book to convince me that the odds of finding such phrases in the Bible are very high. And this comes from someone who takes Bible prophecy seriously and "wants to believe. They have found similar "warnings" or descriptions of events by performing the same equidistant letter searches to "Moby Dick," "War and Peace," and other literature. Drosnin claims the mathematical odds of finding such miraculous words and phrases in the Bible is astronomical. He claims that mathematicians back him up.

But in reality it would be far more surprising to NOT be able to find such words and phrases, given the almost infinite permutations of the searches, and dozens of mathematicians have refuted the main premise of the "Bible Code. It's hard to blame someone for following up on a successful book, but in this case additional writing just gave the author the chance to insert his foot into his mouth and further discredit himself. His original premise, as I understood it, is that God is real, the Bible is divinely inspired, only God could have planned the Bible to contain such codes, and they describe future events which could only have been foreseen by a God outside our restrictions of past, present, and future.

Yet Drosnin more recently says he doesn't even believe in God.

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And that the revelations from what he has decoded are meant to warn us to avert disasters. To warn us so we can avoid biblical disasters and make the events foretold in the Bible not come to pass. I'm not sure what audience Drosnin is trying to write for, but in his sequels he is arguing that Bible prophecy doesn't necessarily happen as written and can be averted, and that there is no God.

He also rants about many left-wing issues, suggesting that we change the way we deal with the Middle East, the environment, and climate change. I would think he is alienating most of his potential audience: people who think there might be codes hidden in the Bible. I assure such readers there is fantastic information "hidden" in the Bible, but I do not think anything useful is revealed through ELS. In a sense this book is dangerous; it is a very well written promotion about a theory which is nonsense, and many eager readers with little background in mathematics will be convinced the idea has merit.

Dec 23, Skylar Burris rated it it was ok Shelves: bible. The topic is fascinating, but the writing is rather banal. The chapter notes which are written as block paragraphs and not referenced by number in the text are as long as the book's primary content. The author can seem a bit repetitive at times. Having said that, the work is worth reading simply because of its interesting subject matter.

Of course, searching for hidden codes can become a kind of word game. Drosnin seems to spend a lot of time plugging things into his computer program just to se The topic is fascinating, but the writing is rather banal. Drosnin seems to spend a lot of time plugging things into his computer program just to see what will come up. He can find quite a bit after the fact, but then, he is no doubt looking for words that fit historical events and excluding words that do not fit. Using this peculiarity the way Drosnin does, as a kind of tarot deck for predicting the potential future, isn't much different than trying to apply the words of Revelation to modern day events in an attempt to predict the Apocalypse.

There is truth to Revelation, but people in every generation have applied the prophecies to their own times, and falsely perceived their ultimate fulfillment there. Likewise, Drosnin foresees an atomic attack in , but when it doesn't materialize, he searches the code again and finds the word "delayed. One wonders, if Rabin wasn't killed, would he be able to search the code and find a word like "delayed" that explained away the false prediction?

What little he tells us of the process of "decoding" the Torah leaves many unanswered questions. One of the most amusing aspects of this book is Drosnin's attempt to explain how the code--assuming it is real and is predictive--can possibly exist without God. For Drosnin is a secularist, and though he admits that the Bible could not have been encoded by a human intelligence, he will not call the intelligence that encoded it God. At one point, Drosnin seems to imply that alien beings with an advanced technology encoded the Bible for our benefit some 3, years ago, and that the Torah is itself a kind of super computer, a technology we do not yet have the power to comprehend and unlock fully.

Jul 14, James rated it did not like it. This book was kind of fascinating at first. My mom had it laying around the house and I think she read it in a book club once. The underlying concept is that they take the first 5 books of the Bible Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy , translate it into Hebrew the original text version , string the letters together from 1 to ,, and then they put them into columns and rows of different size.

For instance, 64 rows of letters. Then they plug the information into the c This book was kind of fascinating at first.

Then they plug the information into the computer and try to find letters equidistant from each other that make up words. Then They try to connect words that are close together that are related to each other. For instance, they found "economic collapse", "the depression", "", and "stocks" all together within the same proximity. The reporter who authored the book said that they took the text, "War and Peace" and tried to do the same thing, but they did not come up with anything close.

The chances were more than 1,, to 1 that all of these things would fit together. However, the whole concept is based on the fact that the Bible is written correctly as we have it today. Latter-day Saints know that we do not have the correct translation of the Bible. In fact, the Book of Moses reveals to us that the first five chapters of Genesis alone were translated incorrectly.

The thought that ran through my mind was that God did not have a hand in this so-called "Bible Code". Someone else did. Furthermore, the scriptures clearly state, "Surely the Lord God will do nothing, but he revealeth his secret unto his servants the prophets" Amos Let's just say that I didn't get past the first two chapters because I got creeped out. Anyway, I don't recommend reading it unless you want to get wrapped up in something that you will regret. May 10, Thing Two rated it liked it. Michael Drosnin, a reporter with Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal, presents his investigative research of the discovery of an apparent code in the Bible.

Science and Faith

It is reputed to be a code embedded primarily in the first five books of the Bible the Jewish Torah -- but theoretically elsewhere in the Bible as well. Allegedly, the Bible Code is able to predict all manner of events, ranging from the Nazi holocaust to Hiroshima to the assassination of presidents and prime ministers, and several Michael Drosnin, a reporter with Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal, presents his investigative research of the discovery of an apparent code in the Bible.

Allegedly, the Bible Code is able to predict all manner of events, ranging from the Nazi holocaust to Hiroshima to the assassination of presidents and prime ministers, and several near-term future events. While Drosnin's writing is very tabloid-like, it is an interesting concept to explore. If I believe God is all-seeing and all-knowing, the idea that we've discovered a code written three thousand years ago for this generation isn't difficult to grasp.

Where I have trouble is with Drosnin's attempts to predict future events - especially since this book was published in But, Dr.

Eliyahu Rips, who is credited with the code's discovery, and is "one of the world's leading experts in group theory, a field of mathematics that underlies quantum physics" according to Drosnin, has this to say: "I used to think that our future was forseen, period. But the Bible code caused me to realize that there is another alternative--all our possible futures were forseen, and we are choosing among them.

Drosnin says the code is only in the Bible, others disagree. Mar 25, Ilan Sonsino rated it it was amazing. The letter stated that an Israeli mathematician, Dr. Eli Rips, had found a hidden code in the Bible that appeared to reveal the details of events that took place thousands of years after the Bible was written. More importantly, Dr. Rips until the following year when Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated. In The Bible Code, Michael Drosnin describes his five-year investigation of the discovery of the code by several famous mathematicians and the amazing way in which the code predicts many important events.

I enjoyed The Bible Code for two main reasons. First, it provides strong proof that the code in the Bible is real. Most pages of the book include portions of Bible text that look like word search puzzles so that the reader can see the code, translate Hebrew words into English, and figure out the meaning.

Those displays really help readers understand a very complicated mathematical subject and convincingly show that the code must be genuine. Also, I liked The Bible Code because it includes so much Hebrew language and history about Israel, both of which really interest me. Dec 16, Debbie rated it liked it.

I originally read this book about 20 years ago when it came out. The only thing I remembered in it was something about Russia and Syria playing a role in the next great war. Needless to say, recent headlines drew me back to the book. Here's what it says: Armageddon is the Greek name for the city in Israel, Megiddo. It's in the north facing Israel's foe Syria. Armageddon is encoded in the Bible with the name of Syria's leader Hafez Asad. It I originally read this book about 20 years ago when it came out. According to the Book of Ezekiel, Israel will be invaded from the north. Syria and Russia are north of Israel.

None of that means the Bible Code is nessarily true. These are interpretations from the Bible that this author found a connection to as well. None of the predictions from when the book was written came true as far as I can tell except this strange connection. I made a mental note 20 years ago to recheck this book and see how it all turned out. Luckily, pretty uneventful. Aug 29, Lance rated it liked it. I heard about this phenomenon when I'd started studying Hebrew. I bought this book on sale at a mall bookshop.

I had problems with it from the start. First off, it uses Hebrew, which doesn't use vowels they're spaced in and around the letters as diacritical marks , so that increases the chances of any consecutive string of letters making words. So, to me, the comparison with War and Peace is so unfair as to make those who proposed it seem almost dishonest.

For instance, my name is Lance. To tra I heard about this phenomenon when I'd started studying Hebrew. The vowels won't be used.

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So, those letters spaced equidistantly apart can be used for my name. Toss in the vowels, the results will decrease dramatically. I noticed that they didn't try it with the rest of the Tanakh. Still, I don't believe that this would have any kind of effect on anyone's salvation or lack thereof.

Dec 24, Glory rated it it was ok Shelves: apologetics , own. A very interesting idea.